Good Questions Training

  • Stimulate deeper thinking.
  • Deepen knowledge, understanding, and awareness.
  • Expand knowledge and extend thinking.
  • Pique curiosity, imagination, interest, and wonder.
  • Encourage students to express and share the depth and extent of their learning in their own unique way. 

WHAT MAKES GOOD QUESTIONS ESSENTIAL

Participants will learn how to develop and use the following four kinds of essential questions to drive learning experiences:

  • Universal  (broad and global ideas, issues, themes, and topics)
  • Overarching (core ideas and enduring understandings)
  • Topical (instructional focus and summative assessment)
  • Driving (differentiation, individualization, and personalization)

By the end of this training, participants will develop good essential questions that will engage students students to delve deeper into the texts and topics they are learning.  They will also use these good essential questions to set the instructional focus and serve as formative, summative, and authentic assessments for lessons, units, and entire courses of study.  Follow-up and implementation can be supported through on-site and remote coaching and classroom walk-throughs. 

The following professional development can be provided to extend, supplement, or in place of one or more of the components of theGood Questions Training 

and theGood Questions Training Modules.

BUILDING BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE WITH GOOD QUESTIONS

Using the best practices and instructional methods addressed in the book Now That's a Good Question!  by Erik M. Francis, participants will explore how one of the most fundamental instructional strategies—questioning—can provide the proper scaffolding to deepen student thinking, understanding, and application of knowledge. You'll learn:


Participants will be introduced to the concept of good questions and how they promote cognitive rigor by challenging students to do the following:

  • Demonstrate higher order thinking as categorized by Bloom's Revised Taxonomy.
  • Communicate depth of knowledge as designated by the levels of Webb's Depth of Knowledge (D.O.K.)  Model. 

By the end of this  training, participants will recognize what are the 8 different kinds of good questions that promote cognitive rigor and how they can use these good questions to set the instructional focus and serve as assessments to deeper student-centered learning experiences.  Participants will also create good questions by rephrasing the performance objectives of academic standards, educational objectives, and learning targets. ​  Follow-up and implementation can be supported through on-site and remote coaching and classroom walk-throughs. 

Who's Asking Good Questions? 

TEACHING AND LEARNING WITH GOOD QUESTIONS

Participants will learn how to develop and use analytical and reflective questions to challenge students to do the following:

  • Examine and investigate how and why.
  • Analyze meaning and reasoning.
  • ​Explain answers, outcomes, results, and solutions.
  • Determine causes, connections, and consequences.

​By the end of this training, participants will develop good analytical and reflective questions they can use to set the instructional focus and serve as formative and summative assessments for deeper student learning experiences.    Follow-up and implementation can be supported through on-site and remote coaching and classroom walk-throughs. 

Participants will learn how to develop good factual questions that will challenge students to describe and explain the following:

  • Academic Vocabulary (Tier 2 Words)
  • Subject-Specific Terminology (Tier 3 Words) 
  • Specific Details and Elements (Factual Knowledge)

By the end of this  training, participants will develop good factual questions that will prompt students to build background knowledge and develop their literacy and  language skills by expecting them to read, research, and report definitions and details insightfully and in their own unique way.   Follow-up and implementation can be supported through on-site and remote coaching and classroom walk-throughs.    

PERSONALIZING LEARNING WITH GOOD QUESTIONS

Contact us to learn more about how we specifically design and deliver our professional development

to meet the needs and expectations for teaching and learning within your state or at your individual school.

MORE TRAINING COMPONENTS COMING SOON!


ALSO, PLEASE CHECK OUT THE SUBJECT-SPECIFIC AND TOPICAL

GOOD QUESTIONS MODULES

OFFERED BY MAVERIK EDUCATION LLC.

UNDERSTANDING AND CREATING GOOD QUESTIONS

Participants will learn how to use the good questions they have developed to engage students to do the following:

  • Read, research, and report to build background knowledge and foundational understanding.
  • Examine and explain how and why concepts, ideas, and procedures can be transferred and used.
  • Investigate to extend their learning about texts and topics.
  • Design to demonstrate and develop their talent and thinking. 

By the end of this training, participants will be able to develop scaffold the good questions to deliver deeper student-centered learning experiences driven by inquiry.  They will also be provided an electronic unit plan template they can use to detail and drive their instruction and assessment.   Follow-up and implementation can be supported through on-site and remote coaching and classroom walk-throughs. 

The Good Questions Training consist of the following components.  These components can be provided individually or as a four part series of professional development trainings to be provided consecutively over the course of an academic year.

ACCLAIM Academy, Phoenix, AZ • Agua Fria Union High School District, Avondale, AZ • The Academy Charter School, Hempstead, NY • All Aboard Charter School, Phoenix, AZ • Avondale Elementary School District, Avondale, AZ • Bassett Unified School District, La Puente, CA • Borger Independent School District, Borger, TX • Buffalo Academy of Science, Buffalo, NY • Cartwright Elementary School District, Phoenix, AZ • CITI BOCES, Syracuse, NY • Consildated School District of New Britain, New Britain, CT • Champion Schools, Phoenix / Chandler, AZ • Denver Public Schools, Denver, CO • EAGLE College Prep, Phoenix, AZ • Enterprise City Public Schools, Enterprise, AL • Espiritu Schools, Phoenix, AZ • Eufaula City Schools, Eufaula, AL • Ganado Unified School District, Ganado, AZ • Grand Canyon University, Phoenix, AZ • Grand Prairie Independent Schools, Grand Prairie, TX • Humboldt Unified School District, Prescott Valley, AZ • Imagine Schools, Phoenix, AZ • Kyrene Elementary School District, Ahwatukee, AZ • Mountain School, Flagstaff, AZ • Muscogee County Office of Education, Columbus, GA • Nassau TRACT, Hempstead, NY • New York State CITI BOCES, Syracuse, NY • OCM BOCES, Syracuse, NY • Palo Alto Unified School District, Palo Alto, CA • Phoenix Advantage Charter School, Phoenix, AZ • PLC Charter Schools, Tolleson, AZ • Planada Elementary School District, Planada, CA • Renaissance Charter School at Cooper City, Hollywood, FL • Rochester Academy Charter School, Rochester, NY • Roxboro Community School, Roxboro, NC • Santa Clara County Office of Education, San Jose, CA • Santa Maria Bonita Elementary School District, Santa Maria, CA • Santa Rita School District, Salinas, CA • Scottsdale Unified School District, Scottsdale, AZ • Self Development Academy, Phoenix, AZ • Sheridan High School, Sheridan, AR • Sunnyside Unified School District, Tucson, AZ • Telesis Center for Learning, Lake Havasu, FL • The Out-of-Door Academy, Sarasota, FL • Tucson Unified School District, Tucson, AZ • Vida Charter School, Gettysburg, PA • West Essex Regional School District, North Caldwell, NJ • Yuma Elementary School District, Yuma, AZ

What is a good question - or rather, how does a good question do the following?

Participants will learn how to assess and evaluate student responses to good questions based upon the following:

  • ​Accuracy: Is the response correct and credible?
  • ​Acceptability: Does the response meet criteria and expectations?
  • ​Appropriateness: Is the response clear, complete, and comprehensible?
  • ​Authenticity: Does the response reflect the depth and extent of the student's learning?

​​By the end of this  training, participants will learn how to use the Good Questions Scoring Guide to assess and evaluate student responses.  They will also receive a copy of the scoring guide that can be used as a classroom or schoolwide grading tool for instruction and assessment.  Follow-up and implementation can be supported through on-site and remote coaching and classroom walk-throughs. 

ASSESSING AND EVALUATING RESPONSES TO GOOD QUESTIONS

DEVELOPING CONCEPTUAL AND PROCEDURAL UNDERSTANDING WITH GOOD QUESTIONS

professional development and program consultation 

Participants will learn how to develop the following good questions to personalize learning:

  • Driving Essential Questions that challenge students to demonstrate what can you design, develop, or do? 
  • Affective Questions that engage students to express what do you believe, feel, or think?
  • Personal Questions that encourage students to share what do you want to learn about the text or topic being taught?

​By the end of this training, participants will develop good questions emphasize and encourage students to demonstrate their talent and thinking and communicate their self-knowledge.   They will also learn how to use these good questions to engage students in project-based, problem-based, S.T.E.M., and service learning experiences.  Follow-up and implementation can be supported through on-site and remote coaching and classroom walk-throughs. 

  • Instructional methods and techniques for using questioning to extend and evaluate student learning experiences.
  • Eight different kinds of questions that challenge students to demonstrate higher-order thinking as categorized by Bloom's Revised Taxonomy and communicate depth of knowledge as designated by Webb's Depth of Knowledge Model
  • How to rephrase the performance objectives of college and career readiness standards into questions that will engage and challenge students to think deeply and express and share the depth and extent of their learning